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YOUR SHIH-TZU PUPPY AND SMALL CHILDREN
Your shih-tzu puppy will do very well with young children as long as a few
guidelines are set in place.   The children MUST be taught to understand the puppy
and handle him properly.  Play time between your shih-tzu puppy and children
must be 100% supervised for the first couple months until the puppy gets older.  If
you think about it ~ you wouldn’t allow your 2 or 3 year old to take your two month
old baby into the other room to play with, would you?  Then please don’t allow them
to take your new
shih-tzu puppy out of your sight.  Play periods must be kept short.  
If you’ve been playing with the puppy for 10-15 minutes, then place the puppy back
in its pen or crate so that it can have some rest time also.  Just as an infant, a new
shih-tzu puppy needs frequent rests.

Have your children sit on the floor so that they are at the puppy’s level.  Let the
puppy come up to the children rather than the children going up to the puppy.  A
child moves quickly and sometimes rather clumsily, and this could frighten a shih-
tzu puppy and cause it to nip in self defense.  A child should never run or shout while
holding the puppy, as this also would cause the puppy to become frightened.  A shih-
tzu puppy will grow and mature just as a child grows and no longer needs as much
supervision.

OTHER PETS
All contact between our shih-tzu puppies for sale and a resident pet should be 100
percent supervised for at least the first two weeks.  Be especially careful if your other
pets are much larger than your new shih-tzu puppy.  One way to separate your pets
is to use child safety gates or pet exercise pens.

A new shih-tzu puppy should also be kept away from areas where non-resident pets
are (public parks, rest stops), until the puppy has finished all of his puppy
immunization shots.  A shih-tzu puppy is not fully immune to these deadly viruses
until all booster shots have been given.

IMMUNIZATIONS & WORMING
It is also important to get your shih-tzu puppy on an immunization program and
heartworm program with your veterinarian.  A record of the immunizations they
have already received will be on your Purchase Agreement.  They have also had a
very thorough worming schedule.  We use Pyrantel 50(for round worms) on weeks 1,
2, 6, and 10, and we use Panacur (a broader spectrum wormer) on weeks 4, 8, and 11.  
They are given heartworm preventative on weeks 8 and 11.  We have also used
Marquis as a preventative for coccidiosis.

BATHING & GROOMING
Grooming is a must.  Bathing once every week to every other week will keep their
coats clean and healthy, and it will prevent matting of the hair.  If a gentle shampoo
is used, a shih-tzu can be bathed weekly without drying out its coat

FEEDING SCHEDULES & CHANGING DOG FOODS
Our shih-tzu puppies for sale should be fed at least four times a day until it is 14
weeks old, three times a day until it is 6 months old, and twice a day after that.  
Please feed your puppy Eukanuba Small Breed Puppy Food.  This dog food is a
premium quality puppy food that is nutritionally dense.  Follow the directions on
the bag for the age and weight of your puppy.  Your shih-tzu puppy can be switched
to an adult formula food between 9-12 mo. of age.  If you choose to switch to a
different brand of dog food, the change must be a gradual one.  Change the food over
a 4 day period, giving 100% of the original food the first day, 75%  original food and
25% new food on the second day, 50% of each the third day, and 25% of the original
and 75% new the fourth day.  This gradual change will reduce the amount of stress
on your shih-tzu puppy.

HYPOGLYCEMIA
Shih-tzu puppies do not have a large fat reserve, so it is essential that these puppies
eat small meals frequently.  Missing a meal can cause these puppies to have
dangerously low glucose levels (hypoglycemia).  Once a puppy’s glucose levels are
low, he might become too confused to eat and could refuse food even though it is the
only thing that will help him.  Such a brief period of fasting in a toy breed puppy can
trigger a hypoglycemic “attack”.  These symptoms are weakness, confusion,
excessive drinking with vomiting, listless, or wobbly gait.  If the puppy doesn’t
immediately receive some form of sugar, (Karo syrup, maple syrup, or honey all
work quickly and then solid food), the puppy will progress to having seizures and
will eventually be comatose.  Permanent brain damage or death can occur if a
puppy’s glucose levels are allowed to drop too low.  This is why it is so critical that
your new puppy eat within – at the most – 12 hours of leaving the seller.  Although
hypoglycemia does not occur frequently, it could happen and early detection is the
key to preventing any serious problems.

If your shih-tzu puppy does not seem to be interested in eating then he must be
coaxed to eat.  If he doesn’t show interest in the dry food then there are several
different foods we recommend to stimulate their appetite:  chicken baby food, 1 raw
egg mixed with 1 tablespoon of Karo syrup, cottage cheese, cooked diced chicken
breast, or a food that is high in protein and high in fat.  Puppy milk replacer can be
purchased at most pet stores, and it works well to entice them also.  If your shih-tzu
puppy is not interested in eating this from the bowl, try putting the food on your
finger for the puppy to lick off, or place the food in the puppy’s mouth with a syringe
or medicine dropper.

HEALTHY TREATS
There are many good treats that are healthy for your shih-tzu puppy.  Rawhide
bones are low in calories and offer dental benefits.  They help remove plaque from
your puppy’s teeth to help keep them clean and healthy.  Treats that are high in
animal protein but low in fat (like chicken or pork) are a good choice also.  Liver
snacks will tempt a picky eater and will promote healthy muscle development and
red blood cell formation.  There are a zillion choices!!

TEETHING TROUBLES
Chewing on Furniture  
Chewing is a natural thing for a shih-tzu puppy to do as its sharp little teeth come
in.  A puppy should not be scolded for something that it is doing to try to make itself
more comfortable (it is as irritating for a shih-tzu puppy to teethe as it is for a
human baby).  However, try to redirect your puppy’s chewing.  Have plenty of chew
toys on hand.  When you see him chewing on furniture or anything that you would
prefer him not to chew on, then distract him with a chew toy and toss it in another
direction.  When your shih-tzu puppy obeys and leaves the chewing on the furniture
for the toy, be sure to give him a small treat and say “Thank you”.  Make sure you
use the same word every time so that he can associate it with his behavior.  

Chewing on Fingers and Toes
I know how cute it is when your shih-tzu puppy chews on your fingers or toes, but
this is a game that can quickly get out of hand.  As your shih-tzu puppy gets older, it
can begin to put a lot more energy into it, and those sharp little teeth will begin to
hurt.  When he decides to chew on you, instead of his toys, you might want to
exclaim “Ouch!” (or whatever word you choose) and walk away.  If he continues to
chew on your toes as you walk away, say “Ouch!” again and place him back into his
exercise pen.  Wait 5 minutes so that he realizes that his biting ended his playtime.  
After the 5 minutes are over, you can take him out and allow him to play again.  If he
begins biting again, then repeat this procedure.  There is always a way to teach a
puppy its life lessons kindly without force, but it takes diligence and consistency on
your part.  If you say “Ouch!” most of the time, but then allow him to chew on you at
other times, he will always be confused…“Is this the time they will let me chew on
them or not?”

OBEDIENCE TRAINING
We recommend attending obedience classes with your new shih-tzu puppy.  A well
trained puppy makes a much better pet than one that is left to its own devices.  
There are many local dog clubs that can be very helpful in assisting you in training
your new shih-tzu puppy.   You could also ask your veterinarian about any
obedience classes or trainers in your area.  I would highly recommend purchasing
and reading “The Dog Listener” by Jan Fennell.  It is easy reading that is packed
with good advice on getting your dog to willingly cooperate.


Congratulations on your new shih-tzu puppy!  May you experience
the joy and happiness that a new puppy brings!  We always enjoy
receiving pictures or e-mails of our shih-tzu puppies in their new
homes.  We would appreciate hearing from you, and we want to
thank you for buying a Prairie View Puppy!!
Fairbury, IL 61739
ph: 815.848.3909
Fax: 815.692.3946
jeffmoser76@gmail.com
Copyright 2010 Prairie
View Shih-tzu
All rights reserved.
Caring for your
Shih-tzu Puppy
A young shih-tzu puppy needs special care, much as
a new baby would.  Treat your new puppy as you
would your own infant:  with patience, constant
supervision and a gentle touch.  Moving to a new
home is a big change for a shih-tzu puppy.  Expect
the puppy to take a few days to acclimate to its new
surroundings.  The way you interact with your new
shih-tzu puppy at this age is crucial to his
socialization.